The City of Grove and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation have teamed up on a project to improve fish habitat on Honey Creek.

The City of Grove provided $5,000 and the ODWC kicked in $15,000 to fund the project.

There are 240 of the “fish city bundles” placed around the Honey Creek area.

Bluegill, sunfish, bass and crappie are among the species expected to take advantage of the new habitat.

The artificial fish habitat, produced by MossBack Fish Habitat of Springdale, Arkansas, are made with 100% PVC.

“Since Grove had supported it, we decided to do the first one there in Honey Creek,” said Josh Johnston, northeast region fisheries supervisor with the OWDC. “We didn’t want to put them somewhere else in the lake. Honey Creek seemed perfect.”

“We had been working with Wildlife for some time to try to come up with a project to enhance the fishery at Grand Lake,” said Grove City Manager Bill Keefer. “We talked about several different options and the one we would have liked to have done, including the stocking of the lake, and that didn’t work out. Josh came back with an opportunity to help fund a grant project that would be used to enhance the fish habitat.

“The return the state put in and with our match, we were given a good return on our investment. Any time we can help and enhance the fish habitat and the fishery of Grand Lake, it’s just a great economic boost for the whole lake community.”

The ODWC portion of the funding for the project came from the Dingell-Johnson Act, legislation passed in 1950 that created a tax on all fishing gear sold in the United States, Johnston said.

“I am hoping we can do more of these in future years if I can pick up a little money here and there and keep this going,” Johnston said.

“We had been working with Wildlife for some time to try to come up with a project to enhance the fishery at Grand Lake,” said Grove City Manager Bill Keefer. “We talked about several different options and the one we would have liked to have done, including the stocking of the lake, and that didn’t work out. Josh came back with an opportunity to help fund a grant project that would be used to enhance the fish habitat.

“The return the state put in and with our match, we were given a good return on our investment. Any time we can help and enhance the fish habitat and the fishery of Grand Lake, it’s just a great economic boost for the whole lake community.”

The habitat enhancers have been dropped in all over the Honey Creek area.

“Anywhere these are, you can find them on wildlifedepartment.com,” Johnston said.

He noted that there’s an interactive habitat map under the fishing link and after clicking on Honey Creek, there are red dots that indicate what and where they’ve been placed.

“If you click on one, it will tell you exactly where we put it,” Johnston said. “You can take those GPS points and put them in the graph on your boat, or just use the map, and head to those areas. You aren’t going to miss them. We put enough out that it’s not like a tiny brush pile here or there. If you go to one of these points where these things are and want to drag on through them or whatever you want to do, you are going to be able to find them on your fish finder or just by dragging things around.”

One plus with these attractors: there should be fewer snags.

“To say you won’t ever get hung up in these things would be crazy because fishing line can do weird stuff, but it’s not going to be anything like a tree,” Johnston said. “You should be able to fish through these things a lot easier, to where you would like to throw crank baits on those points, but you put a brush pile where you can attract the fish, it grabs your crank bait.

“I think this will alleviate some of that. You should be able to pull a crank bait through it.”