MIAMI — Members of the Miami city council voted Friday morning to leave the current COVID-19 emergency ordinance in effect through April 30, but to roll back some restrictions, as Gov. Kevin Still announced Thursday.

As of Friday, Ottawa County had 29 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and one death, according to Police Chief Thomas Anderson.

Personal care businesses — hair salons, barber shops, spas, nail salons and pet groomers — may reopen, but must maintain distance between customers and encourage customers to wait in their car until it is time for their appointment to avoid congestion in the lobbies or entrances.

Exceptions include a customer being a child under 12 or in the instance of a severely handicapped person. Then, more than one person may accompany the customer.

City Attorney Ben Loring said “The whole point of revising the City of Miami’s emergency amendment is to bring it into conformity with what the governor has announced. Miami’s entire ordinance expires at midnight on April 30. The next change in the governor’s plan begins May 1. City Manager Dean Kruithof had a conversation with Integris Miami and they indicated that they are starting to roll back some of their restrictions.”

Kruithof added “But some of the things we have delayed (such as utility shutoffs) will remain in place until June 3.”

Stitt held a press conference Thursday to provide an update on the state’s response to COVID-19 and introduce a new plan, the “Open Up and Recover Safely” plan (OURS), a three-phase approach to open Oklahoma’s economy.

“We have put together a group of industry professionals from across our state, and they have been working with my Governor’s Solution Task Force and our health advisors to develop a way to get back open safely. As we begin to responsibly implement this measured response, we will continue to prioritize the safety of Oklahomans and base all decisions on the data in our state,” Stitt said.

“From the beginning it has been my intent to protect the health and lives of Oklahomans, especially our vulnerable populations, and mitigate the impact to Oklahoma’s economy and get Oklahomans safely back to work,” Stitt said.

Under current White House guidelines, Oklahoma has met all necessary criteria to begin proceeding to a phased opening, including a downward trajectory of documented cases and the ability to treat all patients without crisis care, according to Stitt.

The OURS plan is similar to White House guidelines. This statewide plan is based on scientific modeling from public health experts and is intended to mitigate risk of resurgence, and to protect Oklahoma’s most vulnerable citizens from the COVID-19 threat.

It is also intended for businesses and individuals to utilize in conjunction with guidance from the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, the Oklahoma State Health Department and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Phase 1 of the plan includes:

Elderly and vulnerable Oklahomans should continue to follow the safer-at-home guidelines.

Oklahomans should continue to maximize their physical distance from others when in public, avoid socializing in groups or facilities that do not allow for appropriate physical distancing, and minimize non-essential travel.

Employers should create plans to allow employees to return to work in phases, close common areas or enforce social distancing protocols, minimize non-essential travel and honor requests of employees who are part of a vulnerable population for special accommodations.

Personal care businesses can reopen for appointments only if they adhere to strict sanitation protocols and are in communities that do not have more restrictions in place. This includes hair salons, barbershops, spas, nail salons, and pet groomers. These businesses must maintain distance between customers and encourage customers to wait in their car until it is time for their appointment to avoid congestion in the lobbies or entrances.

State parks and outdoor recreation areas — including those within the city — can reopen.

Grocery stores should continue to maintain special hours for vulnerable populations.

Starting on May 1, restaurant dining rooms, movie theaters, gyms and sporting venues can re-open statewide if they adhere to strict social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Also on May 1, places of worship can reopen for in-person meetings or worship if they leave every other row or pew open and adhere to CDC-recommendations, plus the recommended guidelines from the Oklahoma Department of Commerce.

While bars must remain closed, tattoo parlors can reopen May 1 for appointments only and must adhere to sanitation protocols and social distancing protocols for distancing between customers and visitors, Kruithof said.

During Phase 1, visits to senior living facilities and hospitals are prohibited and schools, organized sporting events and camps should remain closed until further notice.

If Oklahoma’s hospital and incident rates remain at a manageable level for 14 days, the state will move to Phase 2 on May 15, which includes:

Elderly and vulnerable Oklahomans should continue to follow the safer-at-home guidelines.

Oklahomans should continue to maintain physical distancing measures when in public.

Non-essential travel can resume.

Employers should still close common areas or enforce social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Organized sports activities can reopen and operate under proper social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Bars can operate with diminished standing-room occupancy, where applicable and appropriate, and under social distancing and sanitation protocols.

Funerals and weddings can resume under social distancing protocols.

Children’s nursery areas in places of worship can reopen.

Once hospital and incident rates remain at a manageable level statewide for 14 more days Phase 3 will apply, which will allow for further public interaction. Phase 3, which would begin June 1, includes:

Employers can resume unrestricted staffing of worksites.

Summer camps (church and school) can open.

Visits to senior care facilities and hospitals should still be prohibited. Vulnerable citizens are those who are over 65 years of age or individuals with serious underlying health conditions, including high blood pressure, chronic lung disease, diabetes, obesity, asthma, and those whose immune system is compromised such as by chemotherapy for cancer and other conditions requiring such therapy.