Almost 5,500 Ottawa County residents identify themselves as American Indian and most of them claim membership in the nine tribes that have their headquarters here. According to 2010 census figures, Native Americans make up 18.5 percent of Ottawa County’s population and almost 8.9 percent of Oklahoma’s population. Approximately 2.47 million Americans claimed Native American heritage during the most recent census. The tribes offer a wide variety of services to members and also offer assistance to individuals and families who are researching their Native American roots. An Inter-Tribal Council seeks to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of Native Americans. The council also attempts to preserve American Indian cultural values and to enhance and promote general educational and economic opportunities for tribes and tribal members. The council also offers substance abuse outreach and counseling services and supplemental youth training through the Department of Agriculture and Department of Education.

The Eastern

Shawnee Tribe

of Oklahoma 12755 S. 705 Rd. Wyandotte, Okla. 74370 (918) 666-2435 Toll free: 866-674-3786 www.easternshawnee.org

The Eastern Shawnee Tribe is one of three federally recognized Shawnee Tribes residing in Oklahoma. The historic Shawnee people once occupied the rich lands of the Ohio valley region and what would now be states throughout the Appalachian area. They were first forced out of this region by the Iroquois then later driven south and west after a series of battles with American and European powers. Two-hundred and fifty-eight tribal members of the Lewistown Band, which included Shawnees and Senecas, were forcibly removed by the U.S. Government from northeastern Ohio in the winter of 1832. They were led by soldiers across Indiana, Illinois, & Missouri, with 220 members arriving in Indian Territory in late December. During the U. S. Civil War the tribe was temporarily relocated into Kansas. In 1870 enrollment statistics report 63 tribal members. The Eastern Shawnee Tribe is located in eastern Ottawa County near the Oklahoma- Missouri border. Presently tribal membership exceeds 2,400. The tribal complex includes nine administration buildings. Some of the tribe's enterprises include Eastern Shawnee Tribal Enterprises, Burggraf Tire Corporation, People's Bank of Seneca, Mo., Indigo Sky Casino, Whispering Woods RV Park, Outpost Casino, Eastern Shawnee Travel Center, Eastern Shawnee Print Shop, Four Feathers Recycling Center and George J. Captain Library. Their Tribal Museum is 70500 E128 Rd. Wyandotte, Okla. The Museum hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Glenna J. Wallace serves as chief.

The Miami Nation 202 South Eight Tribes Trail Miami, Okla. 74354 (918) 542-1445 Fax: (918) 542-7260 www.miamination.com

The Miami Nation once occupied areas in the southern Great Lakes region, but were resettled in 1846 by the U.S. government to a 500,000-acre reservation in Kansas. A small part of the tribe settled in Ottawa County in 1873, again after pressure from the government. Thomas F. Richardville, a Miami tribal leader recognized today as a chief, was one of the “fathers” of Miami. Today, tribal membership is about 3,800. In a joint venture with the Modoc Tribe, the Miami Nation operates The Stables, a gaming establishment and restaurant in Miami. The tribe also owns and operates Miami Business Services, and Service World Computer Center, Inc., an internet and software business solutions company and its subsidiary; Miami Tribe Entertainment and Gaming, a manufacturer of slot machines; The Prairie Sun and The Prairie Moon casinos; the Leonard Learning Center, a child care facility; the Miami Trading Post Gift Shop and the Miami Cineplex Movie Theatre. Douglas Lankford is chief.

The Modoc Tribe 515 G St. SE Miami, Okla. 74355 (918) 542-1190 Fax: (918) 542-5415

Once occupying lands that would today be along the California-Oregon border, members of the Modoc Tribe were removed to Indian territory in 1873 after capture by U.S. Government armed forces following a six-month war. By 1891, just 68 members of the tribe survived.

Today, with about 200 members, the tribe is the smallest recognized in Oklahoma.

The tribe operates Red Cedar Recycling and The Stables, a gaming facility and restaurant in Miami. The reintroduction of a bison herd is part of the tribes economic development plan. The Modoc Tribal Child Support Program was established to assist all of the tribes in the Miami area, along with several other tribes in Oklahoma, with their child support matters through establishment of paternity & child support orders, locate & enforcement of child support, and a full-service collection & payment center. They are there to answer any questions tribal members might have, and to assist with their child support matter whether it be a new or ongoing case. Feel free to contact them so they may help with your tribal matters.

Bill Follis is chief.

The Ottawa Nation 13 Hwy. 69A Miami, Okla. 74354 (918) 540-1536 Fax: (918) 542-3214 www.ottawatribe.org

When first encountered by Europeans in 1615, the Ottawa Tribe lived along the Canadian shore of Lake Huron where tribal members would eventually form the Lake Confederacy along with the Chippewa and the Pottawatomi tribes. In 1832, as the result of treaty negotiations with the U.S. government, part of the tribe moved to Kansas. Other tribal groups followed until 1839. In 1867, the tribe purchased land from the Shawnee Tribe in what is now Ottawa County. Later, tribal members sold land that would become the city of Miami. The tribe owns the Otter Stop, a convenience store and gas station in Miami, and High Winds Casino. Tribal membership totals about 2,200. Ethel Cook is chief.

The Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma 118 S. Eight Tribes Trail Miami, Okla. 74354 (918) 540-2535 or 1-800-259-9987 Fax: (918) 540-2538 www.peoriatribe.com

The Peoria Tribe was once one of the principal tribes of the Illinois Nation and lived along the Great Lakes. In 1832, while living in Kansas, the Peoria, Kakaskia, Wea and Piankashaw united into “the Confederated Peorias.” In 1867, the Peoria Tribe was removed a second time by the U.S. government. This time they were sent to Indian Territory, settling into modern-day Ottawa County. Today, the tribe has more than 2,800 members. The tribe owns and operates the Peoria Ridge Golf Course and Clubhouse, Buffalo Run Casino, Peoria Gaming Center and the Buffalo Run Hotel. John Froman is chief.

The Quapaw Tribe P.O. Box 765 Quapaw, Okla. 74363 (918) 542-1853 Fax: (918) 542-4694 www.quapawtribe.com

The Quapaw Tribe is indigenous to the region along what is now the Oklahoma, Missouri and Arkansas border. Tribal histories claim the tribe and related Sioux tribes once lived along the shore of the Atlantic Ocean and gradually migrated inland over hundreds of years. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded about 30 million acres of land to the U.S. government and, in 1826, the tribe was moved from Arkansas to Louisiana. Nearly 25 percent of tribal members would die by 1832. In 1838, the tribe was resettled again — this time to Indian Territory. Today, the tribe has about 2,700 members and is governed by a general council. The tribe owns the O-Gah-Pah Convenience Store and Quapaw Casino on Oklahoma 69A northeast of Miami and Downstream Casino & Resort, Kappa Hotel and Nee Spa; Downstream Learning Center and Eagle Creek Golf Club. The tribe also operates a child care center in Quapaw. John Berrey is the tribal chairman.

The Seneca-Cayuga Tribe 23701 S 655 Rd, Grove, Okla. 74354 (918) 787*5452 Fax: (918) 787-5521 sctribe.com

Both once members of the Iroquois Confederacy, the Seneca and Cayuga tribes were joined in Indian Territory in 1881, although a separate Cayuga tribal structure existed into the 1920s. The Seneca Tribe had been living in Indian Territory since 1832. Some members of the Seneca Tribe, along with members of the Quapaw and Shawnee tribes, fought briefly on the side of the Confederacy during the Civil War. Today, the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe lists more than 4,000 members. The tribe owns and operates Grand Lake Casino, north of Grove; Seneca-Cayuga Tobacco, a smoke shop located at the Casino property; a motel, Grand Lake Casino Lodge; and an event center, Grand Lake Event Center, both north of Grove. William Fisher is chief.

The Shawnee Tribe P.O. Box 189 Miami, Okla. 74355 (918) 542-2441 Fax: (918) 542-2922 www.shawnee-tribe.com

The Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma became a federally recognized tribe in 2000 and is one of three federally recognized tribes, along with the Eastern Shawnee and the Absentee Shawnees, to use the Shawnee name. The tribe was forced to give up land in Ohio in the early 1830s and was resettled first in Kansas and then in Oklahoma in 1869. At that time, the Kansas Shawnees were forced to enter into an agreement with the Cherokee Nation which gave the Kansas Shawnee allotments and citizenship in the Cherokee nation. The Shawnee settled in the Cherokee nation around White Oak, Bird Creek (Sperry) and Hudson Creek (Fairland) maintaining separate cultural identities. Known then as the Cherokee Shawnees, they would also later be called the Loyal Shawnees. Tribal members began efforts in the early 1980s to separate the Shawnee Tribe from the Cherokee Nation. Those efforts culminated in 2000 when the U.S. Congress enacted the Shawnee Tribe Status Act which restored the tribe to its sovereign status as an Indian nation. Ron Sparkman is chairman of the tribe. The tribe has approximately 2,200 members and operates the Shawnee Trails Gift Shop and Gallery.

Ron Sparkman is chief.

The Wyandotte

64700 E Hwy 60 Wyandotte, Okla. 74370 (918) 678-2297 Fax: (918) 678-2944 www.wyandotte-nation.org

Originally occupying large portions of land around the Great Lakes and extending into what would now be the middle Atlantic states, the Wyandotte Tribe came to settle in northeastern Kansas in the late 1850s due to a series of treaty negotiations with U.S. government officials. Members of the tribe began migrating — again at the insistence of the government — to northeastern Oklahoma in the late 1860s. Members of the Wyandotte Nation reorganized their tribal government in northeastern Oklahoma in 1871. Today, the tribe has about 4,000 members. The tribe operates a child care center, the Bearskin Healthcare and Wellness Center, the Turtle Stop, a convenience store and gas station, Shell Shiner Car Wash, the Lucky Turtle Casino and the Wyandotte Casino and the new Sonic in Seneca.Almost 5,500 Ottawa County residents identify themselves as American Indian and most of them claim membership in the nine tribes that have their headquarters here. According to 2010 census figures, Native Americans make up 18.5 percent of Ottawa County’s population and almost 8.9 percent of Oklahoma’s population. Approximately 2.47 million Americans claimed Native American heritage during the most recent census. The tribes offer a wide variety of services to members and also offer assistance to individuals and families who are researching their Native American roots. An Inter-Tribal Council seeks to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of Native Americans. The council also attempts to preserve American Indian cultural values and to enhance and promote general educational and economic opportunities for tribes and tribal members. The council also offers substance abuse outreach and counseling services and supplemental youth training through the Department of Agriculture and Department of Education.

The Eastern

Shawnee Tribe

of Oklahoma 12755 S. 705 Rd. Wyandotte, Okla. 74370 (918) 666-2435 Toll free: 866-674-3786 www.easternshawnee.org

The Eastern Shawnee Tribe is one of three federally recognized Shawnee Tribes residing in Oklahoma. The historic Shawnee people once occupied the rich lands of the Ohio valley region and what would now be states throughout the Appalachian area. They were first forced out of this region by the Iroquois then later driven south and west after a series of battles with American and European powers. Two-hundred and fifty-eight tribal members of the Lewistown Band, which included Shawnees and Senecas, were forcibly removed by the U.S. Government from northeastern Ohio in the winter of 1832. They were led by soldiers across Indiana, Illinois, & Missouri, with 220 members arriving in Indian Territory in late December. During the U. S. Civil War the tribe was temporarily relocated into Kansas. In 1870 enrollment statistics report 63 tribal members. The Eastern Shawnee Tribe is located in eastern Ottawa County near the Oklahoma- Missouri border. Presently tribal membership exceeds 2,400. The tribal complex includes nine administration buildings. Some of the tribe's enterprises include Eastern Shawnee Tribal Enterprises, Burggraf Tire Corporation, People's Bank of Seneca, Mo., Indigo Sky Casino, Whispering Woods RV Park, Outpost Casino, Eastern Shawnee Travel Center, Eastern Shawnee Print Shop, Four Feathers Recycling Center and George J. Captain Library. Their Tribal Museum is 70500 E128 Rd. Wyandotte, Okla. The Museum hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Glenna J. Wallace serves as chief.

The Miami Nation 202 South Eight Tribes Trail Miami, Okla. 74354 (918) 542-1445 Fax: (918) 542-7260 www.miamination.com

The Miami Nation once occupied areas in the southern Great Lakes region, but were resettled in 1846 by the U.S. government to a 500,000-acre reservation in Kansas. A small part of the tribe settled in Ottawa County in 1873, again after pressure from the government. Thomas F. Richardville, a Miami tribal leader recognized today as a chief, was one of the “fathers” of Miami. Today, tribal membership is about 3,800. In a joint venture with the Modoc Tribe, the Miami Nation operates The Stables, a gaming establishment and restaurant in Miami. The tribe also owns and operates Miami Business Services, and Service World Computer Center, Inc., an internet and software business solutions company and its subsidiary; Miami Tribe Entertainment and Gaming, a manufacturer of slot machines; The Prairie Sun and The Prairie Moon casinos; the Leonard Learning Center, a child care facility; the Miami Trading Post Gift Shop and the Miami Cineplex Movie Theatre. Douglas Lankford is chief.

The Modoc Tribe 515 G St. SE Miami, Okla. 74355 (918) 542-1190 Fax: (918) 542-5415

Once occupying lands that would today be along the California-Oregon border, members of the Modoc Tribe were removed to Indian territory in 1873 after capture by U.S. Government armed forces following a six-month war. By 1891, just 68 members of the tribe survived.

Today, with about 200 members, the tribe is the smallest recognized in Oklahoma.

The tribe operates Red Cedar Recycling and The Stables, a gaming facility and restaurant in Miami. The reintroduction of a bison herd is part of the tribes economic development plan. The Modoc Tribal Child Support Program was established to assist all of the tribes in the Miami area, along with several other tribes in Oklahoma, with their child support matters through establishment of paternity & child support orders, locate & enforcement of child support, and a full-service collection & payment center. They are there to answer any questions tribal members might have, and to assist with their child support matter whether it be a new or ongoing case. Feel free to contact them so they may help with your tribal matters.

Bill Follis is chief.

The Ottawa Nation 13 Hwy. 69A Miami, Okla. 74354 (918) 540-1536 Fax: (918) 542-3214 www.ottawatribe.org

When first encountered by Europeans in 1615, the Ottawa Tribe lived along the Canadian shore of Lake Huron where tribal members would eventually form the Lake Confederacy along with the Chippewa and the Pottawatomi tribes. In 1832, as the result of treaty negotiations with the U.S. government, part of the tribe moved to Kansas. Other tribal groups followed until 1839. In 1867, the tribe purchased land from the Shawnee Tribe in what is now Ottawa County. Later, tribal members sold land that would become the city of Miami. The tribe owns the Otter Stop, a convenience store and gas station in Miami, and High Winds Casino. Tribal membership totals about 2,200. Ethel Cook is chief.

The Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma 118 S. Eight Tribes Trail Miami, Okla. 74354 (918) 540-2535 or 1-800-259-9987 Fax: (918) 540-2538 www.peoriatribe.com

The Peoria Tribe was once one of the principal tribes of the Illinois Nation and lived along the Great Lakes. In 1832, while living in Kansas, the Peoria, Kakaskia, Wea and Piankashaw united into “the Confederated Peorias.” In 1867, the Peoria Tribe was removed a second time by the U.S. government. This time they were sent to Indian Territory, settling into modern-day Ottawa County. Today, the tribe has more than 2,800 members. The tribe owns and operates the Peoria Ridge Golf Course and Clubhouse, Buffalo Run Casino, Peoria Gaming Center and the Buffalo Run Hotel. John Froman is chief.

The Quapaw Tribe P.O. Box 765 Quapaw, Okla. 74363 (918) 542-1853 Fax: (918) 542-4694 www.quapawtribe.com

The Quapaw Tribe is indigenous to the region along what is now the Oklahoma, Missouri and Arkansas border. Tribal histories claim the tribe and related Sioux tribes once lived along the shore of the Atlantic Ocean and gradually migrated inland over hundreds of years. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded about 30 million acres of land to the U.S. government and, in 1826, the tribe was moved from Arkansas to Louisiana. Nearly 25 percent of tribal members would die by 1832. In 1838, the tribe was resettled again — this time to Indian Territory. Today, the tribe has about 2,700 members and is governed by a general council. The tribe owns the O-Gah-Pah Convenience Store and Quapaw Casino on Oklahoma 69A northeast of Miami and Downstream Casino & Resort, Kappa Hotel and Nee Spa; Downstream Learning Center and Eagle Creek Golf Club. The tribe also operates a child care center in Quapaw. John Berrey is the tribal chairman.

The Seneca-Cayuga Tribe P.O. Box 1283 Miami, Okla. 74354 (918) 542-6609 Fax: (918) 542-3684 stribe.com

Both once members of the Iroquois Confederacy, the Seneca and Cayuga tribes were joined in Indian Territory in 1881, although a separate Cayuga tribal structure existed into the 1920s. The Seneca Tribe had been living in Indian Territory since 1832. Some members of the Seneca Tribe, along with members of the Quapaw and Shawnee tribes, fought briefly on the side of the Confederacy during the Civil War. Today, the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe lists more than 4,000 members. The tribe owns and operates Grand Lake Casino, north of Grove; Seneca-Cayuga Tobacco; a smoke shop located at the Casino property; Grand Lake Casino Lodge; and Grand Lake Event Center, both north of Grove.

William Fisher is chief.

The Shawnee Tribe P.O. Box 189 Miami, Okla. 74355 (918) 542-2441 Fax: (918) 542-2922 www.shawnee-tribe.com

The Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma became a federally recognized tribe in 2000 and is one of three federally recognized tribes, along with the Eastern Shawnee and the Absentee Shawnees, to use the Shawnee name. The tribe was forced to give up land in Ohio in the early 1830s and was resettled first in Kansas and then in Oklahoma in 1869. At that time, the Kansas Shawnees were forced to enter into an agreement with the Cherokee Nation which gave the Kansas Shawnee allotments and citizenship in the Cherokee nation. The Shawnee settled in the Cherokee nation around White Oak, Bird Creek (Sperry) and Hudson Creek (Fairland) maintaining separate cultural identities. Known then as the Cherokee Shawnees, they would also later be called the Loyal Shawnees. Tribal members began efforts in the early 1980s to separate the Shawnee Tribe from the Cherokee Nation. Those efforts culminated in 2000 when the U.S. Congress enacted the Shawnee Tribe Status Act which restored the tribe to its sovereign status as an Indian nation. Ron Sparkman is chairman of the tribe. The tribe has approximately 2,200 members and operates the Shawnee Trails Gift Shop and Gallery.

The Wyandotte

Nation P.O. Box 250 Wyandotte, Okla. 74370 (918) 678-2297 Fax: (918) 678-2944 www.wyandotte-nation.org

Originally occupying large portions of land around the Great Lakes and extending into what would now be the middle Atlantic states, the Wyandotte Tribe came to settle in northeastern Kansas in the late 1850s due to a series of treaty negotiations with U.S. government officials. Members of the tribe began migrating — again at the insistence of the government — to northeastern Oklahoma in the late 1860s. Members of the Wyandotte Nation reorganized their tribal government in northeastern Oklahoma in 1871. Today, the tribe has about 4,000 members. The tribe operates a child care center, the Bearskin Healthcare and Wellness Center, the Turtle Stop, a convenience store and gas station, Shell Shiner Car Wash, a Recycling Center, the Lucky Turtle Casino and the Wyandotte Casino and the new Sonic in Seneca. The Wyandotte Nation broke ground on a 7,184 square foot Community Center in the summer of 2013. The $1.2 million community center, located at 14325 Porcupine Rd., will provide space for a senior center, activity center, kitchen and a saferoom. It will also be the new home to the Wyandotte Nation housing department,

Billy Friend is chief.