City, county and state officials are asking residents to be cautious as residents battle a wintry blast that has robbed hundreds of households of heat.

Miami Fire Chief Kevin Trease and Deputy Fire Chief Ronnie Cline said Monday that they are certain that residents will start turning to their gas stoves for alternative heat sources.

“I guarantee you that it will happen,” Cline said. “Alternative methods carry hidden dangers - including carbon monoxide poisoning.”

Additionally, fire officials confirmed that residential fears of arcing and sparking near electrical meters are “very relative” concerns when power is returned to the city grid.

Residents are asked to be cautios of lines that lay across their yards and to assume that all lines are “hot.”

On Monday, state emergency management officials released the following safety tips:

Avoid Ice - Walking on ice is extremely dangerous. Many cold-weather injuries result from falls on ice-covered sidewalks, steps, driveways and porches. Keep your steps and walkways as free of ice as possible by using rock salt or another chemical de-icing compound. Sand or kitty liter may also be used on walkways to reduce the risk of slipping. Older adults and anyone with difficulty maintaining balance should avoid ice.

Heating Safety - When temperatures fall and power goes out, the possibility of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning rises as people try to stay warm. Invisible, odorless and tasteless, CO is a highly poisonous gas produced by the burning of fuel.

such as gasoline, natural gas, kerosene, charcoal or wood. Un-vented or faulty gas and kerosene appliances have the greatest potential to produce dangerous levels of CO in a home. Smoldering or poorly vented fireplaces, slow burning fuels such as charcoal and vehicle exhausts also are potential indoor hazards. Take these precautions:

€ Look at the color of the flame. A hot blue flame produces less CO and more heat than a flickering yellow flame. If you see yellow flames in your furnace or stove burner, it should be adjusted so that the flame is blue.

€ Don't use an un-vented gas or kerosene heater in closed spaces, especially sleeping areas.

€ Don't use gas appliances such as an oven, range or clothes dryer to heat your home.

€ Don't burn charcoal inside a house, garage, vehicle or tent for heating or cooking, even in a fireplace.

€ Never use an electrical generator indoors or in an attached garage. Only operate it outdoors in a well-ventilated, dry area, away from air intakes to the home, and protected from direct exposure to rain and snow, preferably under a canopy, open shed or carport.

€ Look for CO exposure symptoms including headache, dizziness, weakness, sleepiness, nausea and vomiting that can progress to disorientation, coma, convulsions and death.

€ If you suspect CO poisoning, open doors and windows, turn off gas appliances, and go outside for fresh air. Call 9-1-1 emergency medical services in severe cases.

€ To prevent residential fires, make sure heaters, stoves, and fireplaces are at least three feet from anything that burns. Use screens in front of fireplaces, and do not leave children alone with space heaters. Never leave candles burning when you are not at home or while you are sleeping. If a heater uses fuel like propane or kerosene, use only that kind of fuel and add more fuel only when the heater is cool. Store all fuels outside in closed metal containers.

€ Dangers of picking up limbs

€ Internal heating

€ Driving under low branches

€ Gas meeters

Un-vented or faulty gas and kerosene appliances have the greatest potential to produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide in a home. Smoldering or poorly vented fireplaces, slow burning fuels such as charcoal and vehicle exhausts also are potential indoor hazards. Take these precautions:

€ Look at the color of the flame. A hot blue flame produces less CO and more heat than a flickering yellow flame. If you see yellow flames in your furnace or stove burner, it should be adjusted so that the flame is blue.

€ Don't use an un-vented gas or kerosene heater in closed spaces, especially sleeping areas.

€ Don't use gas appliances such as an oven, range or clothes dryer to heat your home.

€ Don't burn charcoal inside a house, garage, vehicle or tent for heating or cooking, even in a fireplace.

€ Never use an electrical generator indoors or in an attached garage. Only operate it outdoors in a well-ventilated, dry area, away from air intakes to the home, and protected from direct exposure to rain and snow, preferably under a canopy, open shed or carport.

€ Look for CO exposure symptoms including headache, dizziness, weakness, sleepiness, nausea and vomiting that can progress to disorientation, coma, convulsions and death.

€ If you suspect CO poisoning, open doors and windows, turn off gas appliances, and go outside for fresh air. Call 9-1-1 emergency medical services in severe cases.

€ To prevent residential fires, make sure heaters, stoves, and fireplaces are at least three feet from anything that burns. Use screens in front of fireplaces, and do not leave children alone with space heaters. Never leave candles burning when you are not at home or while you are sleeping. If a heater uses fuel like propane or kerosene, use only that kind of fuel and add more fuel only when the heater is cool. Store all fuels outside in closed metal containers.