The state average is down three cents from a week ago, 16 cents from a month ago and 13 cents from this time in 2016.

MIAMI — Heading into the Fourth of July weekend, gasoline prices in Miami are below the state average and considerably lower than the national average.

Four Miami retailers had self-serve unleaded regular for $1.83 Thursday morning and two others had a listed pump price of $1.84 according to gasbuddy.com.

The Oklahoma average Thursday was $1.961 compared to a national average of $2.242.

The state average is down three cents from a week ago, 16 cents from a month ago and 13 cents from this time in 2016.

According to GasPrices.AAA.com, the state average hasn’t been this low since Dec. 2, 2016.

Miami’s average is two cents lower than Tulsa and about a dime cheaper than the average in Oklahoma City.

But prices at Vinita Tuesday were even cheaper than here: an average of $1.786 at five outlets.

“Gasoline stocks in our region are healthy, sitting at 3.3 million barrels ahead of this time last year,” AAA Oklahoma spokesman Chuck Mai said in a release. “As stocks continue to increase, gas prices continue to fall. Today’s state average is 25 cents below the 2017 high of $2.20 recorded on April 14.”

Oklahoma is among the nation’s top 10 states with the cheapest gas.

South Carolina is the lowest nationwide at $1.93.

After Oklahoma, its Alabama ($1.99), Mississippi ($2.00), Missouri ($2.01), Tennessee ($2.02), Arkansas ($2.02), Virginia ($2.03), Texas ($2.06) and Kansas ($2.07).

AAA says motorists may see a small price spike closer to the holiday weekend, similar to the Memorial Day gas price trend.

But because of the low prices and an extended holiday weekend, a record-breaking 44.2 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home, according to the AAA.

That total will be 1.25 million more than last year.

AAA defines the Independence Day holiday travel period as Friday, June 30 to Tuesday, July 4.

“Across the country, strong employment, rising incomes and higher consumer confidence are coaxing more Americans to hit the highway – along with relatively low gas prices,” Mai said. “In terms of sheer number of travelers, this Fourth of July will be historic.”